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What are the reproductive issues?

Once you know you have the p53 gene mutation, you may wonder what the possibility of having a child with Li-Fraumeni Syndrome is. Individuals with LFS have a 50% chance of passing the gene mutation to their children. If a defective p53 gene mutation is passed on, it can cause LFS. This is termed autosomal dominance. Often a diagnosis of LFS is given before or during childbearing years. For people with LFS, the decision to have children can be difficult and intensely personal, due to the possibility of passing the p53 gene mutation on to child or developing cancer as a parent. Some people with LFS have used options such as sperm/egg donors, or pre-implantation genetic diagnosis to ensure their children do not inherit this mutation. There are many qualified experts such as oncologists, genetic counselors and fertility specialists that can help provide valuable information if needed when making this decision.

LFS Association

We are families, like you who have been devastated by the effects of Li-Fraumeni Syndrome, a hereditary cancer predisposition syndrome. Our hopes are to educate, raise awareness and find better screening programs and treatments for LFS.

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Medical Resources

We've compiled a list of doctors available to
answer your questions, LFS support and
treatment. They specialize in many different
areas, which have been listed with their
information.

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LFS News

Newly released articles from Drs. Frederick Li and Joseph Fraumeni.

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Community Events

Team Faces of LFS Color Run
Join or support Team Faces of LFS in The Color Run™ on June 11th, 2017!

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LFS Webinars

Check out our library to watch past LFS
webinars, and to find out about
upcoming webinars!

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LFS Awareness Brochure

Myriad Genetics is proud to partner with LFSA to launch the global LFS Education and Awareness Campaign!


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